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Difficulty of Turkish

 Language Learning Forum : Specific Languages Post Reply
49 messages over 7 pages: 1 2 35 6 7  Next >>
ipekrakunt
Triglot
Newbie
Turkey
Joined 3720 days ago

1 posts - 1 votes
Speaks: Turkish*, English, Spanish

 
 Message 25 of 49
19 August 2010 at 11:24pm | IP Logged 
As a native Turkish speaker, I don't think Turkish is hard to learn. Because it's the other way round for a Turkish speaker to learn an indo-european language, I believe learning the vocabulary won't be too hard. But I guess Turkish idioms could be a burden on mastering this language. On daily conversations we use a lot of idioms and slang, and I guess that could be a problem.
I can help you as much as I can with the grammer; please feel free to ask if you have any questions.
1 person has voted this message useful



William Camden
Hexaglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 4781 days ago

1936 posts - 2333 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish, Russian, Turkish, French

 
 Message 26 of 49
26 August 2010 at 11:05am | IP Logged 
It is not so much that Turkish is difficult. More, if your L1 and previously acquired L2s are Indo-European, it is a case that "everything you know is wrong". Words, phrases and sentences are simply formed differently - very differently. I imagine you would get the same shock of the unfamiliar from starting to learn Finnish, Estonian or Hungarian (although I have never studied them).

Edited by William Camden on 26 August 2010 at 11:05am

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Ertan
Newbie
Turkey
Joined 3746 days ago

15 posts - 16 votes
Speaks: Turkish*
Studies: English

 
 Message 27 of 49
27 August 2010 at 12:08pm | IP Logged 
I think it's very easy if you really understand some basic rules.For example;
with the help of these rules you will not need to learn a lot of word.You will be able to build the new words instead of memorising them.

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michamotor
Tetraglot
Newbie
Germany
Joined 3949 days ago

23 posts - 31 votes
Speaks: German*, Czech, French, English
Studies: Hungarian

 
 Message 28 of 49
31 August 2010 at 8:08pm | IP Logged 
Ertugrul wrote:

So, Çekoslovakyalılaştıramadıklarımızdansınız means You are one of those who we were not able to become Czechoslovakian.


----

I love you is Ben seni seviyorum.


Do you really use such long words in dayli speech or at least in a normal writing style?
When I started studying Hungarian, I heard a lot about the construction of very long and complicated words. But the words I found in newspapers and other sources had normally only 4 endings or even less.

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Ertan
Newbie
Turkey
Joined 3746 days ago

15 posts - 16 votes
Speaks: Turkish*
Studies: English

 
 Message 29 of 49
31 August 2010 at 8:50pm | IP Logged 
michamotor wrote:
Ertugrul wrote:

So, Çekoslovakyalılaştıramadıklarımızdansınız means You are one of those who we were not able to become Czechoslovakian.


----

I love you is Ben seni seviyorum.


Do you really use such long words in dayli speech or at least in a normal writing style?
When I started studying Hungarian, I heard a lot about the construction of very long and complicated words. But the words I found in newspapers and other sources had normally only 4 endings or even less.


Of course we aren't use very long words as in the example.
I can truely say that %75 of Turkish words are very short.And we have some long words too but they are usually the loan words,especially words which has arabic origin.
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William Camden
Hexaglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 4781 days ago

1936 posts - 2333 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish, Russian, Turkish, French

 
 Message 30 of 49
07 September 2010 at 3:56pm | IP Logged 
Basic words can be short in Turkish. The basic word in the above example is just Çekoslovakya. It is the suffixes piled onto it that make it such a long word, equivalent to a sentence in an Indo-European language.
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CaucusWolf
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3781 days ago

191 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Arabic (Written), Japanese

 
 Message 31 of 49
07 September 2010 at 11:31pm | IP Logged 
    I heard somewhere that Ukrainian was actually influenced by Turkish. Does anyone know about this? I heard also that Ukrainian has been heavily Russofied and most just speak Russian anyway. If Turkish is related to the original Ukrainian I'll put it on my hit list.   

Edited by CaucusWolf on 07 September 2010 at 11:32pm

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ellasevia
Octoglot
Winner TAC 2011
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4651 days ago

2150 posts - 3229 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, French, Greek, Italian
Studies: Russian, Swedish, Persian, Turkish, Japanese

 
 Message 32 of 49
07 September 2010 at 11:38pm | IP Logged 
Turkish and Ukrainian are unrelated, but Russian and Ukrainian are closely related. Ukrainian and Russian are both East Slavic languages of the Indo-European family while Turkish is a Turkic language of the Altaic family. However, because of the great expanse of the Ottoman Empire, Turkish influenced (and was influenced itself also) a great many languages of the regions it covered, including Greek, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Hungarian, etc. I would venture to say that it could definitely have influenced Ukrainian in this way too.


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