Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Difficulty of Turkish

 Language Learning Forum : Specific Languages Post Reply
49 messages over 7 pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7  Next >>
hombre gordo
Triglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 4092 days ago

184 posts - 247 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish, Japanese
Studies: Portuguese, Korean

 
 Message 1 of 49
17 December 2009 at 10:24am | IP Logged 
How difficult would it be for me to learn Turkish?

I have been told that it is an "easy language"? My friend holds the opinion that 6 months living there is enough for attaining fluency.

However, I dont believe what he says. I dont believe it is an easy language. Being a non-indoeuropean language with few traits related to my own language, it is probably going to be considerably harder to learn than the likes of French (which my friends considers a difficult language), Spanish and German.

On the other hand, I was once told it is grammatically difficult to the extent that it is on par with, or pretty close to Hungarian in terms of complexity. One person even told me that it surpasses Hungarian.

How difficult do you think this language is?

Specifically for me, would knowledge of Japanese and Korean grammar serve as a help to grasp its grammar?
2 persons have voted this message useful



staf250
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Belgium
emmerick.be
Joined 4206 days ago

352 posts - 414 votes 
Speaks: French, Dutch*, Italian, English, German
Studies: Arabic (Written)

 
 Message 2 of 49
17 December 2009 at 11:36am | IP Logged 
I can't give you a grade of difficulty, I'm only beginning to learn like you.
The difficulty seems to me that almost all words are new. The grammar seems less difficult than many other
languages.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Fazla
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Italy
Joined 4771 days ago

166 posts - 255 votes 
Speaks: Italian, Serbo-Croatian*, English, Russian, Portuguese, French
Studies: Arabic (classical), German, Turkish, Mandarin

 
 Message 3 of 49
17 December 2009 at 7:41pm | IP Logged 
Every word is basically new (well, at least for a japanese native speaker, I who speak Bosnian as my first language found many similiar if not identical words) although the grammar is awesome, meaning that the irregularities are almost non existant. Still, IMHO, it has a lot of difficult grammar concepts to master, you can express really a lot of niances (is there such a word in English?) with different constructs... for an example you say things that happened that you personally witnessed with one construct, and things you didn't personally witness with another one... that's just one example, there are many others. All in all, IMHO, completely affordable if you have enough willingness to make it, a big plus are words, especially verbs that are really really short... I'd say 70% of them aren't composed of more than 4 letters. They get long only because it is an agglutinative language.
5 persons have voted this message useful



darkwhispersdal
Senior Member
Wales
Joined 4549 days ago

294 posts - 363 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Ancient Greek, French, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Japanese, Latin

 
 Message 4 of 49
17 December 2009 at 10:18pm | IP Logged 
Fazla wrote:
...you can express really a lot of niances (is there such a word in English?) with different constructs...


Do you mean nuance?

I've just started with this language and so far it doesn't seem too bad compared to when I started out with russian. So good luck if you start it.
1 person has voted this message useful



zhiguli
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 4950 days ago

176 posts - 221 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Russian, Mandarin

 
 Message 5 of 49
18 December 2009 at 9:50am | IP Logged 
As someone who's studied Turkish and Hungarian, and is currently studying Japanese..

hombre gordo wrote:

I have been told that it is an "easy language"? My friend holds the opinion that 6 months living there is enough for attaining fluency.


Not easy, but it's known for being very logical. Only one irregular verb, and very few irregularities in vowel harmony (usually related to foreign words).
It'll take longer to master than Spanish or German but not as long as Japanese, the Latin-based alphabet being one of the big reasons.
Turkish also has a decent amount of vocabulary from French and English, and it doesn't get mutilated to the extent it does in Japanese, so it won't be completely foreign.

Quote:

On the other hand, I was once told it is grammatically difficult to the extent that it is on par with, or pretty close to Hungarian in terms of complexity. One person even told me that it surpasses Hungarian.


Not sure about this. Turkish may have more suffixes and longer words but Hungarian has way more cases, exceptions, side-rules, etc. which make it more difficult overall.

Quote:

Specifically for me, would knowledge of Japanese and Korean grammar serve as a help to grasp its grammar?


Most likely. A Turk I know who's studied Japanese describes its grammar as "simplified Turkish" and so far I find it hard to disagree.

8 persons have voted this message useful



iltoen
Newbie
Germany
Joined 4397 days ago

21 posts - 22 votes
Speaks: Turkish*

 
 Message 6 of 49
18 December 2009 at 3:07pm | IP Logged 
i think what my confuse you is the word order as it confused me when i was learning German and English. The basic word order of turkish is subject object verb as you can know in English it is subject verb object.
1 person has voted this message useful



Ertugrul
Diglot
Groupie
Turkey
Joined 4171 days ago

63 posts - 124 votes 
Speaks: Turkish*, English
Studies: Arabic (Written)

 
 Message 7 of 49
18 December 2009 at 5:47pm | IP Logged 
Once i've checked a Japanese grammar book, i've called it "simplified Turkish". Yes, i agree to this expression.
On the other hand, personally Japanese is much more harder than Turkish because of the writing system.

Since they share the same language origin (though both languages have changed in time) the rules, suffixes, cases and even some basic words look like.

Turkish grammar is hard. However, it is very systematic and exceptions are too low.
The most important thing which makes Turkish hard to learn is the loanwords.
Some of Arabic and Persian loanwords are converted to Turkish and they follow the basic Turkish grammar rules.
But most of the loanwords do not follow the rules. So they form the exceptions.

The crucial part of Turkish is vowel harmony and transforms.
If you master the vowel harmony you realize that Turkish is strictly organized and logical.
Because Turkish had been spoken for many years without being written it addresses to ears although it is not very melodical :)

Edited by Ertugrul on 18 December 2009 at 5:52pm

8 persons have voted this message useful



staf250
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Belgium
emmerick.be
Joined 4206 days ago

352 posts - 414 votes 
Speaks: French, Dutch*, Italian, English, German
Studies: Arabic (Written)

 
 Message 8 of 49
18 December 2009 at 5:52pm | IP Logged 
I'm pleased with your explanations, very interesting!


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 49 messages over 7 pages: 2 3 4 5 6 7  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3906 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.