Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Systematic Study Charts

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
40 messages over 5 pages: 1 2 3 4


jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
Moderator
SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5341 days ago

4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 33 of 40
19 January 2013 at 9:46am | IP Logged 
It's downloadable from Arguelles' own website:
http://www.foreignlanguageexpertise.com/Sample%20Study%20Cha rt.xls
8 persons have voted this message useful



dmaddock1
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3865 days ago

174 posts - 426 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Esperanto, Latin, Ancient Greek

 
 Message 34 of 40
03 January 2014 at 9:58pm | IP Logged 
With the arrival of the new year I thought it would be fun to post some screenshots here of the language log spreadsheet I created for myself, inspired by Prof. Arguelles.

I use Google Docs which is handy for me to update immediately after a study session with my phone, access at work, etc. There is a sheet for each year and a summary sheet which gives me a big picture view of my progress.

First, here's what an annual sheet looks like:



Of course, each row is a day of the year and each language has a set of columns. Everything is in hours (so, 0.5 = 30min; 0.25 = 15min). At the top I sum each language (see red box #2), split into reading/writing, listening/speaking, and overall total. In red box #1, are the totals for all languages for the whole year: total hours, hours per week, and hours per day. Every 7 days I give the total hours for that week on the left, (eg. red box #3).


My summary sheet looks like this:



On the left I pull together the top-row figures from all the yearly sheets. I also record hours spend with Anki taken straight from its report. In the middle, I have my long-term goal for each language in hours. Finally, I draw some simple bar graphs showing how the time was spread across the various languages.


I've been tracking myself with this system for 5 years now and I highly recommend it. As you can see from the totals, I'm no polyglot genius. I'm a part-time dabbler and language tourist. The consensus here seems to be that tracking is only useful if you're putting in massive hours on a ton of languages, but my experience suggests it is quite useful in the opposite case as well. Due to work and family obligations, I can't spend large chunks of my day studying and without a way to keep track it would feel like I was making no progress at all sometimes.

d.
10 persons have voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3823 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 35 of 40
03 January 2014 at 11:14pm | IP Logged 
That tracker spreadsheet looks lovely! I just started using the iPhone app ATracker which
lets me time myself while doing various tasks I've defined and then creates exportable
charts and graphs for myself. I think by the end of the month I'll be able to see how
useful the data is.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Zwlth
Super Polyglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3658 days ago

154 posts - 319 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Arabic (Written), Dutch, Swedish, Portuguese, Latin, French, Persian, Greek

 
 Message 36 of 40
04 January 2014 at 7:31am | IP Logged 
Very impressive! I'm not sure whether these kind of charts do more than help those of us
with the language bug manage our obsession productively, but that in itself is certainly
enough. I only wish my own charts were this detailed and systematic!
1 person has voted this message useful



Retinend
Triglot
Senior Member
SpainRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2740 days ago

283 posts - 557 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish
Studies: Arabic (Written), French

 
 Message 37 of 40
22 March 2014 at 3:48am | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
It's downloadable from Arguelles' own website:

http://www.foreignlanguageexpertise.com/Sample%20Study%20Cha rt.xls


Thanks, but where on the site was this linked to? I'd like to know what the numbers 456
and 91 mean. Is "91" the volume of scriptorium logs? This chart seems to have started in
2008, so how many years do these sum hours of 4450 represent? Very fascinating to see the
numbers like this, anyway.
1 person has voted this message useful



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5637 days ago

3133 posts - 4350 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 38 of 40
22 March 2014 at 9:25am | IP Logged 
Retinend wrote:
I'd like to know what the numbers 456 and 91 mean. Is "91" the volume of scriptorium logs? This chart seems to have started in 2008, so how many years do these sum hours of 4450 represent? Very fascinating to see the numbers like this, anyway.


Looking at the formulas and layout:
456 is the number of days in the spreadsheet. It covers January 1, 2007 up to March 31, 2008. 365 days in 2007, 60 days in January (31 days) and February (29 days, 2008 was a leap year), + 31 more for March. 4450 is the total study hours in those 15 months. Professor Arguelles was averaging 9 hours and 45 minutes per day 7 days a week during that period.

Edited by luke on 22 March 2014 at 9:34am

3 persons have voted this message useful





jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
Moderator
SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5341 days ago

4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 39 of 40
22 March 2014 at 1:21pm | IP Logged 
Retinend wrote:
Thanks, but where on the site was this linked to?


It's linked to on this page:
http://www.foreignlanguageexpertise.com/polyliteracy.html
1 person has voted this message useful



luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5637 days ago

3133 posts - 4350 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 40 of 40
27 March 2014 at 7:57am | IP Logged 
luke wrote:
Retinend wrote:
I'd like to know what the numbers 456 and 91 mean. Is "91" the volume of scriptorium logs? This chart seems to have started in 2008, so how many years do these sum hours of 4450 represent? Very fascinating to see the numbers like this, anyway.


Looking at the formulas and layout:
456 is the number of days in the spreadsheet. It covers January 1, 2007 up to March 31, 2008. 365 days in 2007, 60 days in January (31 days) and February (29 days, 2008 was a leap year), + 31 more for March. 4450 is the total study hours in those 15 months. Professor Arguelles was averaging 9 hours and 45 minutes per day 7 days a week during that period.


91 is the number of days into the current year. January, February and March = 31 + 29 + 31 = 91.


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 40 messages over 5 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4

If you wish to post a reply to this topic you must first login. If you are not already registered you must first register


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.2852 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.