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I love you in different languages

 Language Learning Forum : Philological Room Post Reply
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janalisa
Triglot
Senior Member
France
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Speaks: English*, French, Japanese
Studies: Russian, Norwegian

 
 Message 17 of 58
09 June 2010 at 1:37pm | IP Logged 
QiuJP wrote:
Chinese(Mandrian):

我爱你。(wo2 ai4 ni1)


As you're a native speaker I'm sure you know perfectly well how to pronounce this, but didn't you write the numbers of the tones wrong? It should be "wo3 ai4 ni3".
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iamrobertyee
Bilingual Triglot
Groupie
Philippines
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Speaks: Tagalog*, Cebuano*, EnglishC2
Studies: Mandarin

 
 Message 18 of 58
09 June 2010 at 3:00pm | IP Logged 
In Tagalog we say "Mahal kita"

In cebuano we say "Gipalangga tikaw"

Amazing how we say I love you in different languages.. love seems a complicated thing to express- but it's still sweet!
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rlf1810
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United States
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Speaks: English*, German, Slovak

 
 Message 19 of 58
09 June 2010 at 4:01pm | IP Logged 
A quick clarification for Slovak:

Ľúbim ťa = I love you
Milujem ťa = Something like, 'I love you so incredibly much that you can't even imagine.' In other words, much stronger than 'Ľúbim ťa' and only used romantically.

Between family and friends Slovaks sometimes use the phrase 'Mám ťa rád' or 'Mám ťa ráda', if the speaker is a female, to express love. This literally means 'I like you'. However, one will not likely find a Slovak saying 'Milujem ťa' to their mother, lest they be accused of incest ;)

-Robert
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Sennin
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Bulgaria
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 Message 20 of 58
09 June 2010 at 6:37pm | IP Logged 
я тебя люблю! /ia tibia liubliu/    Руский
обичам те! /obicham te/    Български
je t'aime! /jtem/   ( ...moi non plus! ) Français


[edit] Sorry, used "q" for "ia" in the Russian transcription; That's because q looks like я and sometimes I use it as a replacement for the cyr letter.

yall wrote:
EDIT: On further reflection, and after a google search (it's not 1990 after all), it seems that "Ti amo" is only used for lovers while "Ti voglio bene" is used for everyone you love (lovers, friends, family, etc).

Similarly, in French "Je t'aime bien" is "I like you", not "I love you"; I suppose bene = bien, and I have no idea what's voglio ^_^.


Edited by Sennin on 09 June 2010 at 6:51pm

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Fanch35
Triglot
Newbie
France
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 Message 21 of 58
09 June 2010 at 9:20pm | IP Logged 
Breton : Da garout a ran
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QiuJP
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Singapore
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Speaks: Mandarin*, EnglishC2, French
Studies: Czech, GermanB1, Russian, Japanese

 
 Message 22 of 58
09 June 2010 at 9:39pm | IP Logged 
janalisa wrote:
QiuJP wrote:
Chinese(Mandrian):

我爱你。(wo2 ai4 ni1)


As you're a native speaker I'm sure you know perfectly well how to pronounce this, but didn't you write the numbers of the tones wrong? It should be "wo3 ai4 ni3".


It is something I can pronounce but I cannot put it in pinyin. In fact I learn Pinyin at secondary school! Blame the screw up education of Singapore!
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ember
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CyprusRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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 Message 23 of 58
09 June 2010 at 10:05pm | IP Logged 
Could German native speakers explain something to me: when I was in Germany, I sometimes heard the expression "Ich hab' dich lieb" instead of "Ich liebe dich". That was said by lovers, not friends. So what's the difference? Does it signify less attachement/ not so deep feelings?
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rlf1810
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United States
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Speaks: English*, German, Slovak

 
 Message 24 of 58
09 June 2010 at 11:20pm | IP Logged 
ember wrote:
Could German native speakers explain something to me: when I was in Germany, I sometimes heard the expression "Ich hab' dich lieb" instead of "Ich liebe dich". That was said by lovers, not friends. So what's the difference? Does it signify less attachement/ not so deep feelings?


I'm not a native but, from my understanding 'ich habe dich lieb' has less weight attached to it, less intensity, compared to 'ich liebe dich'.


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