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Scriptorium demonstration video

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
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JayR9
Senior Member
United Kingdom
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155 posts - 162 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 17 of 25
22 August 2012 at 8:44pm | IP Logged 
Hey thanks for the quote and the links. Both Interesting threads.

I actually read somewhere that you are meant to write characters with your right hand to get the strokes correct. Do you know If that Is true?

I am a lefty but after reading that link, I might try writing the characters using my right hand so I concentrate more.
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dcbaok
Groupie
United States
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Speaks: English*
Studies: Mandarin

 
 Message 18 of 25
22 August 2012 at 9:23pm | IP Logged 
Stroke order and direction are standardized for right handers. I haven't had a major
problem with this as a beginner learning characters. It's a bit more challenging but so
is writing Latin alphabet. Not sure how it will work with real handwriting if I ever get
to that level.

I would be curious to learn how native left handers cope with writing in characters.
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whitelily
Diglot
Senior Member
Norway
Joined 4065 days ago

42 posts - 47 votes
Speaks: Norwegian*, English
Studies: Arabic (classical), Urdu

 
 Message 19 of 25
22 September 2012 at 7:19pm | IP Logged 
I have tried this method, and I do find it quite beneficial. I combine it with trying to understand the grammatical
aspects of the sentence I´m copying. However, my worry is that this technique seems to be quite time-consuming?
Will this technique help one to progress quickly in the target language?
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Sterogyl
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 2799 days ago

152 posts - 263 votes 
Studies: German*, French, EnglishC2
Studies: Japanese, Norwegian

 
 Message 20 of 25
15 March 2013 at 11:55am | IP Logged 
This is one of the techniques I don't really get. I don't find it beneficial. :/ The other techniques presented by Prof. Arguelles are very good - I particularly respect his mastery of time management! - but this one (along with blind shadowing maybe) don't seem very senseful to me. Plus it's very boring. (This is my personal point of view. I don't say this is valid for everyone else.)
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jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
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SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
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 Message 21 of 25
15 March 2013 at 5:23pm | IP Logged 
I've found it especially beneficial for Mandarin because there are so many characters that otherwise wouldn't stick.

Maybe you don't have any difficulties learning your Japanese kanji, what do I know.
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Sterogyl
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 2799 days ago

152 posts - 263 votes 
Studies: German*, French, EnglishC2
Studies: Japanese, Norwegian

 
 Message 22 of 25
15 March 2013 at 5:44pm | IP Logged 
Hello Jeff

jeff_lindqvist wrote:

Maybe you don't have any difficulties learning your Japanese kanji, what do I know.


Of course it is difficult.

I learnt kanji in a different way. I used anki (front: German meaning/Japanese readings/3-5 compounds in Japanese and German; back: Japanese characters); but since Professor Arguelles never uses SRS and flash cards, maybe Scriptorium is the only alternative.

However, just copying is not as effective as recalling the characters actively. At least for me.

Apart of that Arguelles recommends his Scriptorium technique also for languages with latin script... I only tried it once to be honest (one page), but I really didn't enjoy it. I had the feeling it wouldn't produce any effect at all...
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jeff_lindqvist
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 Message 23 of 25
16 March 2013 at 12:18am | IP Logged 
I'm using Anki as well (for many reasons), but the words don't stick as easily as when I'm actually writing them by hand. Seeing them is not enough.

I have used the technique (including the reading aloud part) for a few other languages as well (German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch) and found it extremely beneficial. But everybody is different.
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Sterogyl
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 2799 days ago

152 posts - 263 votes 
Studies: German*, French, EnglishC2
Studies: Japanese, Norwegian

 
 Message 24 of 25
16 March 2013 at 9:15am | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
I'm using Anki as well (for many reasons), but the words don't stick as easily as when I'm actually writing them by hand. Seeing them is not enough.


I fully agree with you. I also have to write them by hand. The question side of my cards consists of latin letters only. And I have to write them in Japanese. Then I check the answer. Example:

Front (question):

KEI, E, megu(mu) - segnen; Almosen spenden

TENKEI - Himmelsgabe
ONKEI - Gnade, Wohltat
... (+ 2, 3 other compounds)

Back (answer):



天恵
恩恵
...


(The other characters in the compounds must be characters already studied, of course.) I have to write the characters out of my memory. Just copying is better than not writing them at all/only recognizing them, it is true, but it is not the most effective way, imo.

Quote:

I have used the technique (including the reading aloud part) for a few other languages as well (German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch) and found it extremely beneficial. But everybody is different.


If it is good for you, perfect. But I need the "active recall part". Otherweise it would be too boring and unsatisfying. What I do for other languages is something like a "modified Scriptorium technique" (actually it's a translation exercise with hints):

Question:

Paris war belagert, ausgehungert und lag in den letzten Zügen. Die Spatzen auf den Dächern wurden selten, die Gossen entvölkerten sich. Man aß alles.

P é b, a e r. L m s f b r s l t, e l é s d. O m n'i q. <hints>

Answer:

Paris était bloqué, affamé et râlant. Les moineaux se faisaient bien rares sur les toits, et les égouts se dépeuplaient. On mangeait n'importe quoi.


But this I do with whole texts on paper (half a page or so at a time), usually not with single sentences (but would be possible too, of course). And I usually use bilingual sources to create the texts.


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