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Price of Polyglottery - New Prof

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
90 messages over 12 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 11 12 Next >>
tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 3136 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 81 of 90
09 October 2013 at 11:22am | IP Logged 
I didn't have a choice, because I'm Dutch and thus you get English and German thrust upon
you. Furthermore I really wanted to learn Swedish (and also Icelandic).
1 person has voted this message useful



Lykeio
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 2673 days ago

120 posts - 357 votes 

 
 Message 82 of 90
09 October 2013 at 11:34am | IP Logged 
Sometimes you get large chunks of family's anyway by accident, so I needed French and
Italian and already had Latin, that's quite decent but I'll probably never pick up
Spanish or Portugese, know I'll never go for Romanian or the various small "dialects"
and less common Romance languages. I have English (can I count Old English separately?)
and can read German but I'll never have Norwegian etc so...I'm actually worse on German
languages than I thought, huh.

I've also tried the whole learning in family group things. After Sanskrit I picked up
Pali and started with various prakrits but it very quickly got mind numbing. Like, very
quickly.

At some point the benefits aren't worth the effort, though obviously some languages
need to be learnt like this so in order to try and improve my Hittite I picked up some
Luwian and Palaic. It did help actually.

Incidentally has anyone read Babel no more? The author suggests that a lot of the
hyper-polyglots (what an odd term...) tend NOT to work through families but are more
interest driven. That's the original point I wanted to bring up here, its odd that the
prospective syllabus would focus on families when the typical practice seems to be more
like what posters in this thread are saying.
3 persons have voted this message useful



lichtrausch
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
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525 posts - 1071 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Japanese
Studies: Korean, Mandarin

 
 Message 83 of 90
10 October 2013 at 2:03am | IP Logged 
Lykeio wrote:

I have English (can I count Old English separately?)
and can read German but I'll never have Norwegian etc so...I'm actually worse on German
languages than I thought, huh.

I've got English and German and consider myself done with the Germanic languages. To me, the rest of them are just variations on the theme -- variations with not enough speakers to bother. However I do still dabble in them from time to time to satisfy wanderlust. Especially Norwegian and Icelandic.
1 person has voted this message useful



montmorency
Diglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3257 days ago

2371 posts - 3675 votes 
Speaks: English*, German
Studies: Danish, Welsh

 
 Message 84 of 90
10 October 2013 at 3:55am | IP Logged 
Lykeio wrote:
Sometimes you get large chunks of family's anyway by accident, so I
needed French and
Italian and already had Latin, that's quite decent but I'll probably never pick up
Spanish or Portugese, know I'll never go for Romanian or the various small "dialects"
and less common Romance languages. I have English (can I count Old English separately?)


Of course! (If you actually know Old English, that is :-) ).


Most native-speakers of English would have to study Old English in order to understand
it. Knowing German and/or Dutch would probably help a bit, but only a bit, in my
estimation.


Quote:


I've also tried the whole learning in family group things. After Sanskrit I picked up
Pali and started with various prakrits but it very quickly got mind numbing. Like, very
quickly.

At some point the benefits aren't worth the effort, though obviously some languages
need to be learnt like this so in order to try and improve my Hittite I picked up some
Luwian and Palaic. It did help actually.



I think Prof. A. suggests that the more languages you know in a given family, then the
easier the later ones become, or something like that. But I think that effect only
kicks in after about the 4th one in the family! :-)


Quote:

Incidentally has anyone read Babel no more? The author suggests that a lot of the
hyper-polyglots (what an odd term...) tend NOT to work through families but are more
interest driven. That's the original point I wanted to bring up here, its odd that the
prospective syllabus would focus on families when the typical practice seems to be more
like what posters in this thread are saying.



I guess it is suggested for the reason I mention above. Prof. A. isn't exactly typical.
1 person has voted this message useful



Sterogyl
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 2796 days ago

152 posts - 263 votes 
Studies: German*, French, EnglishC2
Studies: Japanese, Norwegian

 
 Message 85 of 90
11 October 2013 at 4:15pm | IP Logged 
So did anyone try a regime like this? 9 hours a day, divided into alloted time-slots consisting of shadowing bilingual texts of several languages, scriptorium, reading a great book like Oliver Twist and discussing another great book like Lavoisier's Traité élémentaire de chimie, logical training, all of which rounded off by some physical exercise?
1 person has voted this message useful



Sibsil
Triglot
Newbie
China
Joined 3243 days ago

9 posts - 27 votes
Speaks: Mandarin*, Korean, English

 
 Message 86 of 90
12 October 2013 at 10:27am | IP Logged 
Sterogyl wrote:
So did anyone try a regime like this? 9 hours a day, divided into
alloted time-slots consisting of shadowing bilingual texts of several languages,
scriptorium, reading a great book like Oliver Twist and discussing another great
book like Lavoisier's Traité élémentaire de chimie, logical training, all of which
rounded off by some physical exercise?


Sounds excellent to me! But, I think I need to learn how to have discipline like that.
And that is why professor suggests institute: to help people learn how to study like
that.   
1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 3136 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 87 of 90
12 October 2013 at 9:14pm | IP Logged 
Sterogyl wrote:
So did anyone try a regime like this? 9 hours a day, divided into
alloted time-slots consisting of shadowing bilingual texts of several languages,
scriptorium, reading a great book like Oliver Twist and discussing another great
book like Lavoisier's Traité élémentaire de chimie, logical training, all of which
rounded off by some physical exercise?


I did read bilingual texts, but they were all full of snark. It was an exhilarating
experience and they taught me loads of slang :)
1 person has voted this message useful



Sibsil
Triglot
Newbie
China
Joined 3243 days ago

9 posts - 27 votes
Speaks: Mandarin*, Korean, English

 
 Message 88 of 90
29 December 2013 at 8:02am | IP Logged 
Professor A. has made new video to talk about research in polyglot learning styles.


7 persons have voted this message useful



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