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Price of Polyglottery - New Prof

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
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montmorency
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 Message 73 of 90
06 October 2013 at 3:33pm | IP Logged 
By the way, from the Youtube description:

Quote:

Published on 19 Sep 2013
This talk was the keynote speech at the 2013 International Conference on Multilingual
Proficiency: Language, Polyglossia, and Polyglottery, hosted by the American Society of
Geolinguistics and the Amici Linguarum International Association. It was held at the
Baruch College Department of Modern Languages at the City University of New York on
September 6 - 7, 2013. Young fellow polyglots Timothy Doner and Alexander Rawlings also
gave presentations.


Does anyone happen to know if the presentations by Timothy Doner and Alexander Rawlings
are available, or will become available?


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Retinend
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 Message 74 of 90
06 October 2013 at 3:47pm | IP Logged 
I have a question too, about the whole "Great Books" idea. I'm dimly recalling something
Arguelles said about how the time needed to learn a language could be greatly reduced if
the language learning was incorporated into a study of great books in that language. From
what I dimly recall, he was advocating this because difficult but worthwhile books should
be read over and over again - and with Arguelles style of learning (shadowing,
scriptorium) this would be inherent in the study regime. Does anyone else remember hearing
about this in one of Arguelles's videos.... maaaybe in something he wrote?

To sum up: reduction of overall study time; incorporation of language study into a study
of great books.
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montmorency
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 Message 75 of 90
06 October 2013 at 4:53pm | IP Logged 
Retinend wrote:
I have a question too, about the whole "Great Books" idea. I'm dimly recalling something
Arguelles said about how the time needed to learn a language could be greatly reduced if
the language learning was incorporated into a study of great books in that language. From
what I dimly recall, he was advocating this because difficult but worthwhile books should
be read over and over again - and with Arguelles style of learning (shadowing,
scriptorium) this would be inherent in the study regime. Does anyone else remember hearing
about this in one of Arguelles's videos.... maaaybe in something he wrote?

To sum up: reduction of overall study time; incorporation of language study into a study
of great books.


I cannot quickly find a passage saying exactly that, but it does ring a bell. A good place to start looking may be here:

Ideal systematic training in polyglottery

In that, he made his ideas about a Polyglot Institute fairly clear, years before the recent lecture video was recorded.

See also this, which quotes an interesting part of the same thread:

activating by immersion thread

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lichtrausch
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 Message 76 of 90
06 October 2013 at 5:04pm | IP Logged 
Sibsil wrote:

That really depend where you come from. I can get farther with Classical Chinese, Korean, Japanese than I ever get with European languages or Arabic. And this is supposed to be international program. I think professor mention two tracks for each civilization - one for people from there, one for other people. So there do not need to be lower standards, just different ones.

If you're talking just about a few languages, then yes. But if it's going to be 6+ languages (standard polyglot definition), then it's another story. The diversity of the major languages of East Asia is at least three times greater than that of the major Western languages. And this has consequences for polyglots. How many polyglots have you seen that are proficient in all the major East and S.E. Asian languages I listed in the last post? I haven't seen a single one. But I've seen a number who are proficient in all the major Western languages.
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tarvos
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 Message 77 of 90
06 October 2013 at 6:00pm | IP Logged 
Chinese characters do help though. Also, why Vietnamese and not f. ex. Cantonese? Why
Classical Chinese? A polyglot wouldn't really need Latin either.
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lichtrausch
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 Message 78 of 90
07 October 2013 at 1:41am | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
Chinese characters do help though. Also, why Vietnamese and not f. ex. Cantonese? Why
Classical Chinese? A polyglot wouldn't really need Latin either.

I was limiting the selection to major languages (as these are the ones people are usually interested in learning), and you can hardly call a language which is rarely seen in written form a major language. I included Classical Chinese and Latin because the Professor considers classical languages an essential part of polyliteracy. Personally I could do without them though.
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tarvos
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China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 4543 days ago

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Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 79 of 90
07 October 2013 at 12:00pm | IP Logged 
I did study Latin but at school a long time ago and I forgot most of it. But personally I
don't really think in families, which is why I found those tracks annoying because I'd
rather get a bigger overview (one from each major family). The trouble being that I
already have one for quite a few families (Romance, Germanic).
1 person has voted this message useful



lichtrausch
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
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525 posts - 1072 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Japanese
Studies: Korean, Mandarin

 
 Message 80 of 90
09 October 2013 at 2:02am | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:

But personally I don't really think in families, which is why I found those tracks annoying because I'd rather get a bigger overview (one from each major family). The trouble being that I already have one for quite a few families (Romance, Germanic).

I prefer to get one from each major family too. You'll never catch me trying to complete a family. Only from Romance would I learn several languages, because of their incredible proliferation.


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