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Becoming a professor

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
31 messages over 4 pages: 1 2 3 4  Next >>
zerothinking
Senior Member
Australia
Joined 6219 days ago

528 posts - 772 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 1 of 31
10 June 2009 at 3:57pm | IP Logged 
Dear ProfArguelles,

I'm not sure if this has already been asked but I'd like to ask your advice on and
experiences of becoming a professor in languages. I'm considering many different careers
and I think becoming a professor of modern languages of something like that would be
quite exciting. I think your advice would be valuable for anyone in the future who is
considering becoming a professor. I've already looked it up a great deal but I'd love a
first hand account.

Thank you kindly,

Peter.
1 person has voted this message useful



Kugel
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6385 days ago

497 posts - 555 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 2 of 31
11 June 2009 at 8:44pm | IP Logged 
I also would like to hear from someone in the know about academia. All I ever hear are bad things.

I'm particularly interested in the part time adjunct gig, as I wouldn't ever want to quit my current job.
1 person has voted this message useful



GuardianJY
Groupie
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5532 days ago

74 posts - 72 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Italian, Swedish, French

 
 Message 3 of 31
11 June 2009 at 8:46pm | IP Logged 
I agree with Kugel. I'd love to do it as a secondary job. I'd get practice with the foreign languages I teach as well. You know something the best when you teach it.
1 person has voted this message useful



laoshu505000
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5663 days ago

121 posts - 232 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 4 of 31
11 June 2009 at 8:59pm | IP Logged 
That's right. As they say ''Teach to learn, learn to teach''


GuardianJY wrote:
I agree with Kugel. I'd love to do it as a secondary job. I'd get practice with the foreign languages I teach as well. You know something the best when you teach it.

2 persons have voted this message useful



zerothinking
Senior Member
Australia
Joined 6219 days ago

528 posts - 772 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 5 of 31
12 June 2009 at 4:53am | IP Logged 
Kugel wrote:
I also would like to hear from someone in the know about academia. All I
ever hear are bad things.

I'm particularly interested in the part time adjunct gig, as I wouldn't ever want to quit
my current job.


I've heard some bad things too. I'd just love to hear from anyone. I'd never teach at a
primary or high school simply because there are way too many unmotivated kids who don't
care about the language. At a university the chances are that most of them are doing it
because they chose it.
1 person has voted this message useful



snovymgodom
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5572 days ago

136 posts - 149 votes 
Speaks: English*, Russian

 
 Message 6 of 31
12 June 2009 at 5:36am | IP Logged 
Quote:
At a university the chances are that most of them are doing it
because they chose it.


For many of the languages considered "difficult" by Americans (Russian, Arabic, Japanese, Chinese), this statement is true. However, when observing Spanish classes at my university I still notice the lack of motivation that is common among high school students. This is a great deal due to the foreign language requirement in place - we are required to study a foreign language and pass the third-year examination. For people who aren't interested in languages at all, Spanish is usually chosen because it is considered "easy".

However I agree with your statement regarding academia, if I were a language instructor I would prefer to be in a university environment than in a high school.
1 person has voted this message useful



zerothinking
Senior Member
Australia
Joined 6219 days ago

528 posts - 772 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 7 of 31
12 June 2009 at 10:13am | IP Logged 
snovymgodom wrote:
Quote:
At a university the chances are that most of them are doing
it
because they chose it.


For many of the languages considered "difficult" by Americans (Russian, Arabic,
Japanese, Chinese), this statement is true. However, when observing Spanish classes at
my university I still notice the lack of motivation that is common among high school
students. This is a great deal due to the foreign language requirement in place - we
are required to study a foreign language and pass the third-year examination. For
people who aren't interested in languages at all, Spanish is usually chosen because it
is considered "easy".

However I agree with your statement regarding academia, if I were a language instructor
I would prefer to be in a university environment than in a high school.


I think compulsory subjects at university is a travesty! How dare they? If they don't
want to learn a foreign language they won't learn it. The fact that a university does
that is very concerning. English speakers don't need a foreign language to succeed.
It's true. It will help them in life and is enriching but it's not necessary. I can see
why they wouldn't want to put in the effort for something they don't care about.
1 person has voted this message useful



OneEye
Diglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 6697 days ago

518 posts - 784 votes 
Speaks: English*, Mandarin
Studies: Japanese, Taiwanese, German, French

 
 Message 8 of 31
13 June 2009 at 7:40am | IP Logged 
zerothinking wrote:
I think compulsory subjects at university is a travesty! How dare they? If they don't
want to learn a foreign language they won't learn it. The fact that a university does
that is very concerning. English speakers don't need a foreign language to succeed.
It's true. It will help them in life and is enriching but it's not necessary. I can see
why they wouldn't want to put in the effort for something they don't care about.


Is that really a foreign concept? I know university systems differ from country to country but I didn't think it was by that much. This is very standard in America. Most universities here require a certain number of courses in several subjects (math, sciences, English composition, foreign language, history, etc.). Then within the major certain courses will usually be required and certain ones will be left up to the student to decide on. Many programs require a minor, which is generally up to the student, and there is usually some room for electives.

Is it really the case in Australia that you can choose which classes to take without anything being compulsory? That seems very odd to me, and more of a travesty than having a few required courses. Students will miss out on the benefits of a well-rounded education if they were left to decide every course they take (I know I would probably take nothing but language and history classes if I could, but I appreciate the other classes and the broad knowledge I receive from them).


1 person has voted this message useful



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