Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Passive Listening

  Tags: Passive | Listening
 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
32 messages over 4 pages: 1 2 3 4  Next >>
jody
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

242 posts - 252 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Russian, Bulgarian

 
 Message 1 of 32
20 March 2008 at 9:28am | IP Logged 
I have read a lot on this forum about passive listening. For example, listening to music, watching a movie, or listening to an audio book in a passive manner. In other words, not for understanding but only for "noise". I cannot understand this idea.

As an example, my wife bought me a tape with Bulgarian stories. I listen to it in my car, and when i have spare time. It doesn't help me at all. My thought is, what does it matter if I don't understand one word of it? Sure, I understand a "dobre" here or a "znaesh" there, but mostly I can't tell when one word ends and the next one begins. I could listen to it a million times and never understand a word of it.

Am I doing something wrong? Or am I simply expecting too much from this passive approach. I do realize that I can't learn a language just by listening, but I have read so much about people improving in this way.

Thanks for your input.
Jody
1 person has voted this message useful



Captain Haddock
Diglot
Senior Member
Japan
kanjicabinet.tumblr.
Joined 5201 days ago

2282 posts - 2814 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: French, Korean, Ancient Greek

 
 Message 2 of 32
20 March 2008 at 9:44am | IP Logged 
I agree, I don't think passive listening accomplishes anything, other than perhaps helping you recognize a language.
1 person has voted this message useful



DaraghM
Diglot
Senior Member
Ireland
Joined 4584 days ago

1947 posts - 2923 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: French, Russian, Hungarian

 
 Message 4 of 32
20 March 2008 at 9:59am | IP Logged 
I don't think passive listening in just the target language can be beneficial, unless you're at an advanced stage, or you simply just want to pick up the rhythm. I've mentioned it before, but passive listening with either "Learn in your car" or "Vocabulearn" can be helpful. You aren't completely passive, but it's not stressful, and you end up learning more than you'd imagine.
1 person has voted this message useful



jody
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4671 days ago

242 posts - 252 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Russian, Bulgarian

 
 Message 5 of 32
20 March 2008 at 10:22am | IP Logged 
Okay, maybe I was reading too much into it. Not very helpful.

I'm starting the listening-reading approach that siometterio (or however you spell her name) outlined. I have some text in English and Russian, and the audio in Russian. So far I can follow along as they read in russian, but if I lose my place then it is really hard to find it again. I can see how this would be helpful, but I realize I will have to use my grammar books. I so hate these grammar books. I wish there was an easy way...(i'm so lazy)
1 person has voted this message useful



rob
Diglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 4598 days ago

287 posts - 288 votes 
2 sounds
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: French, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Norwegian, Mandarin

 
 Message 6 of 32
20 March 2008 at 11:26am | IP Logged 
If you're listening to something purely for background noise, then I wouldn't expect too much of it. I think the point of passive listening is to be able to pick out a certain number of words at given stages of learning. For example, when you start, you may listen to the radio and only be able to understand that it is Bulgarian, but not understand a single word. You might not even know it's Bulgarian to start with. After a couple of months, you'll pick out a number of words but not really understand anything. After perhaps half a year to a year you'll start to get a general picture of the meaning, etc.

The point is, if you listen to something you're not familiar with, and something which doesn't explain itself (as language courses do), then your understanding will start at nothing and gradually improve as your studies progress. It's also beneficial to listen to the language in lots of different contexts, and especially to listen to it being used naturally.
1 person has voted this message useful



vanityx3
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4894 days ago

331 posts - 326 votes 
1 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Japanese

 
 Message 7 of 32
20 March 2008 at 11:40am | IP Logged 
I'm not sure if you can learn a language only by listening to it, except your native one.

But, if you are at an intermediate level with a language, listening to your target language hours a day will help you greatly. The language will start sounding less fast and each word will sound more and more clear.
1 person has voted this message useful



Hollow
Bilingual Triglot
Senior Member
United States
luelinks.netRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4972 days ago

179 posts - 186 votes 
Speaks: French*, English*, SpanishB2
Studies: Korean

 
 Message 8 of 32
20 March 2008 at 11:58am | IP Logged 
I don't know to what extent this is valid in Bulgarian, but passive learning helps me for Korean because I get a better idea of cadence, accent and tone used. Pausing in korean doesn't always follow English or french pauses in a sentence, and so listening helps me to gauge the rythm of the language in a way that staring at text cannot.


3 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 32 messages over 4 pages: 2 3 4  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.2813 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.