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Team Катюша - TAC 2014 - TEAM THREAD

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
464 messages over 58 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 9 ... 57 58 Next >>
Via Diva
Diglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
last.fm/user/viadivaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2717 days ago

1109 posts - 1427 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: German, Italian, French, Swedish, Esperanto, Czech, Greek

 
 Message 65 of 464
13 January 2014 at 4:08pm | IP Logged 
chokofingrz wrote:

Hope I didn't sound like a brain-damaged chimpanzee!

No, not at all, but:

Здравствуйте! Меня зовут Мартин. Как поживаете? (singular to plural) Я живу в Англии, работаю программистом, и мне тридцать два (32) года. Я изучаю русский язык менее месяца. Это мой первый текст на русском. Я говорю на английском, французском, немецком, испанском и итальянском. Но русский [язык] труднee! Я никогда не был в России, но я серьезно интересуюсь российским кино. До скорой встречи!

If something's not clear, feel free to ask :)

Edited by Via Diva on 14 January 2014 at 2:59am

3 persons have voted this message useful



geoffw
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3171 days ago

1134 posts - 1865 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Yiddish
Studies: Modern Hebrew, French, Dutch, Italian, Russian

 
 Message 66 of 464
13 January 2014 at 4:25pm | IP Logged 
I was rather confused and found this explanation, which seems to clear things up:

When talking about your age you need to know the word ‘years’. In Russian this word has
an irregular plural:

1: год
2-4: года
5-0: лет

Сколько вам лет? - How old are you?
Мне восемнадцать лет - I am 18 years old
Мне двадцать три года - I am 23 years old.

********

Why "Я говорю на английском, ..."? I still don't understand this correction. Does it
have to do with the fact that there is a list, and not just one language? All I could
find was this, which didn't help:

Вы говорите по-английски? - Do you (formal) speak English?
Вы говорите по-русски? - Do you (formal) speak Russian?
Я говорю по-английски - I speak English
Я говорю по-русски - I speak Russian

Thanks!
2 persons have voted this message useful



Via Diva
Diglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
last.fm/user/viadivaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2717 days ago

1109 posts - 1427 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: German, Italian, French, Swedish, Esperanto, Czech, Greek

 
 Message 67 of 464
13 January 2014 at 4:31pm | IP Logged 
Well, it's just how the language works, we need to put preposition in order to connect words. No, it doesn't matter at all:
Я говорю на русском.
Я говорю на русском и английском.

1 person has voted this message useful



geoffw
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3171 days ago

1134 posts - 1865 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Yiddish
Studies: Modern Hebrew, French, Dutch, Italian, Russian

 
 Message 68 of 464
13 January 2014 at 4:37pm | IP Logged 
So is Я говорю по-русски incorrect?
1 person has voted this message useful



Via Diva
Diglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
last.fm/user/viadivaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2717 days ago

1109 posts - 1427 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: German, Italian, French, Swedish, Esperanto, Czech, Greek

 
 Message 69 of 464
13 January 2014 at 4:51pm | IP Logged 
It's correct, we just connecting words not with the preposition, but by changing the word - it transforms to an adverb from full adjective.
3 persons have voted this message useful



Марк
Senior Member
Russian Federation
Joined 3539 days ago

2096 posts - 2972 votes 
Speaks: Russian*

 
 Message 70 of 464
13 January 2014 at 5:07pm | IP Logged 
geoffw wrote:
I was rather confused and found this explanation, which seems to clear things up:

When talking about your age you need to know the word ‘years’. In Russian this word has
an irregular plural:

1: год
2-4: года
5-0: лет

Сколько вам лет? - How old are you?
Мне восемнадцать лет - I am 18 years old
Мне двадцать три года - I am 23 years old.

Well, it has an irregular genetive plural. In Russian we use the nominative singular after один (одна, одно), the genetive singular of nouns after два (две), три, четыре and the genetive plural after any number bigger than четыре. One has to take into account that it is the last word in the numeral which determines the form of the following nouns and adjectives. So, один стол, два стола, пять столов, двадцать один стол, двадцать два стола, двадцать пять столов.

********
geoffw wrote:


Why "Я говорю на английском, ..."? I still don't understand this correction. Does it
have to do with the fact that there is a list, and not just one language? All I could
find was this, which didn't help:

Вы говорите по-английски? - Do you (formal) speak English?
Вы говорите по-русски? - Do you (formal) speak Russian?
Я говорю по-английски - I speak English
Я говорю по-русски - I speak Russian

Thanks!

Well, how do you say: to type English or to type in English?
Говорить (which is speak, say, talk, tell) means to pronounce something meaningful. You can pronounce a word, a sentence, a text, but not a language, can't you? So, you can either говорить по-русски (in a Russian way) or говорить на русском (языке) in (lit. on) Russian (I can't say why the preposition на is used here).

Edited by Марк on 13 January 2014 at 5:18pm

4 persons have voted this message useful



geoffw
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3171 days ago

1134 posts - 1865 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Yiddish
Studies: Modern Hebrew, French, Dutch, Italian, Russian

 
 Message 71 of 464
13 January 2014 at 5:15pm | IP Logged 
Марк wrote:

I think a month of learning is not enough to count things in Russian.
********
Говорить (which is speak, say, talk, tell) means to pronounce something meaningful. You
can pronounce a word, a sentence, a text, but not a language, can't you? So, you can
either говорить по-русски (in a Russian way) or говорить на русском (языке) in (lit.
on) Russian (I can't say why the preposition на is used here).


Thanks! That's very helpful. And I remembered that numbers act differently in Russian,
as well as that there was a difference between the forms of the word for "year(s)," but
I had forgotten/not yet learned that those two concepts also affect each other like
that. (Unlike the user who wrote this intro, I've spent more than a month overall
studying Russian, but my current attempt has indeed only been going for about a month.)
1 person has voted this message useful



Cristianoo
Triglot
Senior Member
Brazil
https://projetopoligRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2604 days ago

175 posts - 289 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, FrenchB2, English
Studies: Russian

 
 Message 72 of 464
13 January 2014 at 5:57pm | IP Logged 
это мой интродукция:

меня зовут Cristiano. Я живу в Бразилии и учусь pоссии себя

I'm a very beginner in Russian. I can produce almost nothing without a dictionary or
translators, but I hope I can speak it someday.

My goals are:
(1) To be able to read cyrillic without much effort. (2) To handle myself in russia
in very basic situations, like the ones a tourist may find. These are short term goals
(not that I'm stopping once I reach them)

давайте учиться!




1 person has voted this message useful



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