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Team Катюша - TAC 2014 - TEAM THREAD

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
464 messages over 58 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 47 ... 57 58 Next >>
Serpent
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 Message 369 of 464
22 July 2014 at 5:40am | IP Logged 
Did they deliberately exclude Pushkin? :)
I've read less than half of these, and I hadn't even heard of the books by Pelevin and Popov. It definitely looks like a decent list though.
I liked those by Dostoevsky, Bulgakov and Gogol most, and I love Lermontov but I prefer his poetry.

Edited by Serpent on 22 July 2014 at 5:40am

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Via Diva
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 Message 370 of 464
22 July 2014 at 7:09am | IP Logged 
Well, most of these books are the part of standard school program. I have studied an advanced one, though, and I can say that we have 15 of them studied (differently, but still). I also haven't heard of books by Pelevin and Popov, and I haven't read What is to be Done? and Petersburg. Absence of Pushkin is surprising, I would recommend his prose (I just adore Dubrovsky, but the most common choice is The Captain's Daughter).
A word on War and Peace - it's big and full of French from the very little that I've managed to read, and when it was the time to discuss this book at school literature lessons I was getting away by reading the short version of the novel (aka краткое содержание, you'll find a lot of it if you try to search for it).
I hate Quiet Flows the Don, but it's about taste and that sort of thing, it's worth a try anyway.
And as it written there, We is indeed the major influence to 1984, but having read them both in Russian I can say that We is much harder to read.
P.S. When people try to choose a little from Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, they usually fail. These two require much more attention. I enjoy Dostoevsky's White Nights more than The Brothers Karamazov, same goes for Tolstoy's Resurrection comparing to War and Peace.
P.P.S. I would add:
Griboyedov: Woe from Wit
Saltykov-Shchedrin: anything (I personally don't like him, but that doesn't really matter)
Chekhov: anything

Edited by Via Diva on 22 July 2014 at 7:15am

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chokofingrz
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 Message 371 of 464
22 July 2014 at 1:34pm | IP Logged 
Nice list, no I have not read a single one, but there are at least 7 books there I have heard of and would like to read one day, but I'll probably go for the English versions. I need to raise my level a lot before I'm ready to understand a serious literary book in Russian.
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Serpent
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 Message 372 of 464
22 July 2014 at 9:00pm | IP Logged 
Yeah, we had Oblomov, War and Peace and We in the curriculum but I never read these :P I've now been trying to read Guerra e pace in Italian but the beginning is boring :/

Agreed with your extra choices (although if we include poetic works, Evgeni Onegin is a must imo)
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Solfrid Cristin
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 Message 373 of 464
22 July 2014 at 10:48pm | IP Logged 
Thank you for the input, all of you :-)

I have another little nut for you.

I came across this little gem on the Internet this evening. It is performed by a Norwegian of Belarusian origin,
Aleksander Rybak, who won the Eurovision Song Contest in 2009, and it sounds strangely familiar, though I
cannot recall having heard it before. The name of the guy this is a tribute to, is also unfamiliar to me, though
he is obviously very famous.

Can the native Russians give me some background information?

Russian song
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Serpent
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 Message 374 of 464
23 July 2014 at 12:16am | IP Logged 
It's called Я спросил у ясеня and it's in Ирония судьбы :)
Nowadays it's part of the popular culture, maybe especially when women mock men for being indecisive and asking the trees, the wind, the moon and the rain for relationship advice :-) Instead of actually hearing what women tell them :D
in the end he asks his friend and the reply is "she was your beloved, now she's my wife". and yes it might have been mean, but he wasted too much time speaking to nature and lost this woman.

Not everyone is as cynical as me though ;)

Edited by Serpent on 23 July 2014 at 12:22am

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Via Diva
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 Message 375 of 464
23 July 2014 at 2:37am | IP Logged 
Serpent, if we include poetic works, we can't get away without more of Pushkin and Lermontov, adding Yesenin, Akhmatova and Mayakovsky to get minimum program only, hehe. I personally need to finally read some Brodsky, but just can't get down to it :)
But if someone here is interested in poetry, I can try to make an actual list of interesting poems, just don't expect to find translations to every single one of them.
P.S. 20th century poetry with translations (can't stand the temptation to share)

Edited by Via Diva on 23 July 2014 at 2:40am

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Serpent
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serpent-849.livejour
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 Message 376 of 464
23 July 2014 at 5:20am | IP Logged 
I meant longer pieces, like Woe from Wit or Mtsyri at least.


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