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German: massive input in Berlin

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patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2832 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 89 of 295
02 February 2014 at 12:25am | IP Logged 
Anna thanks for dropping by. :)

BAnna wrote:
Great advice for a language learner, and thanks for the reviews. It's not so easy to get films in German here in the US, so I am slightly envious...ok, a lot envious.


I often think that people exaggerate the advantages of learning when you are living in your L2 country, but it definitely is useful to be able to go to a video store, of the local library (I can borrow up to +20 DVDs from the library at one go here), or go the cinema to see a film.

I have paid a monthly pass to the Yorck arthouse cinema group here in Berlin and try to get to the cinema 2-3 times a week. Most of the films are dubbed, but catch most of the German films that have come out.

By far the best German film I've seen in the last 12 months is 'Oh, Boy' so if you get a chance to see it do. It's not super-deep or heavy, but it's got a nice pace and really captures Berlin well.

I am holding off seeing the German classics until I am closer to C1, because I want to understand the subtlety of the films better. I am really looking forward to getting into Fassbinder, for instance.

What is a bit annoying is that I'll be in Australia during the Berlin Biennale. Still can't complain about the weather.

BAnna wrote:

I just finished "Kitchen" by Banana Yoshimoto translated into German and found it to be surprisingly easy to read. I wonder if there's something about Japanese sentence structure that leads to easily comprehensible German?


I think that might be true. The two Murakami's I've read in German were good easy reads (Norwegian Wood is definitely worth a look if you haven't read it), but having said that I found Keroauc and the two Nesbø's straightforward too (the Harry Hole krimis are good). Though Murakami was a bit easier than the other two authors - the sentences are just more straightforward somehow.

BAnna wrote:

Often I watch Tatort on the ARD Mediathek website with the German subtitles for the hearing-impaired put on. It helps a lot to avoid missing a key element of the story or if you want to take notes on a particularly interesting bit of slang.


I usually watch it with my wife on TV (who's an addict) or with her in a bar so I don't get a chance to use subtitles. There are in fact more than 60 bars in Berlin who show it live on Sunday evenings. Some even offer discounts on the appropriate regional beers.

Edited by patrickwilken on 02 February 2014 at 12:29am

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patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2832 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 90 of 295
02 February 2014 at 2:38pm | IP Logged 
I have been checking out this free open-source grammar checker that Doitsujin suggested: https://www.languagetool.org/.

It seems quite useful when writing German. It can be added as it both as an extension to LibreOffice and to Firefox.
5 persons have voted this message useful



g-bod
Diglot
Senior Member
United KingdomRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 4281 days ago

1485 posts - 2002 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: French, German

 
 Message 91 of 295
02 February 2014 at 4:03pm | IP Logged 
patrickwilken wrote:

BAnna wrote:

I just finished "Kitchen" by Banana Yoshimoto translated into German and found it to be surprisingly easy to read. I wonder if there's something about Japanese sentence structure that leads to easily comprehensible German?


I think that might be true. The two Murakami's I've read in German were good easy reads (Norwegian Wood is definitely worth a look if you haven't read it), but having said that I found Keroauc and the two Nesbø's straightforward too (the Harry Hole krimis are good). Though Murakami was a bit easier than the other two authors - the sentences are just more straightforward somehow.


I think in general translation from one language to another can lead to a certain amount of simplification. However, I think Murakami's writing style in Japanese is also very straight forward. I was put off reading him for a long time because I thought as it is "literature" it was bound to be difficult, but actually it's very accessible. I haven't read "Kitchen" yet in Japanese, but it's on my bookshelf looking at me, so I really ought to give it a go!
2 persons have voted this message useful



patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2832 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 92 of 295
03 February 2014 at 10:39am | IP Logged 
g-bod wrote:

I think in general translation from one language to another can lead to a certain amount of simplification. However, I think Murakami's writing style in Japanese is also very straight forward. I was put off reading him for a long time because I thought as it is "literature" it was bound to be difficult, but actually it's very accessible. I haven't read "Kitchen" yet in Japanese, but it's on my bookshelf looking at me, so I really ought to give it a go!


I am not sure about the 'simplification' of text as it is translated. I think that really depends on the translator. What I found interesting with Murakami is that some of his books were translated into German from English, not Japanese, as it's cheaper to find English-German translators. After some criticism over the apparently bad job of translating the sex scenes (!) in the first German translation of 'South of the Border, West of the Sun' Murakami is now only be translated directly from Japanese.



I don't know how much that holds for other books though. If anyone knows the current situation regarding translations in Germany I would be really interested to know. I am quite happy to read a direct translation, but even a good translation-of-a-translation seems to be getting too far away from the original author's voice.

I do agree that reading translations in German can be easier, because the sentence structure of English (and Japanese?) tends to be shorter than the famously long German style, which makes a big difference when your vocabulary is still not sufficiently developed.

Edited by patrickwilken on 03 February 2014 at 4:03pm

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jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
Moderator
SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
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 Message 93 of 295
03 February 2014 at 1:53pm | IP Logged 
Fixed Murakami link
1 person has voted this message useful



patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2832 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 94 of 295
03 February 2014 at 4:03pm | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
Fixed Murakami link


Thanks. I've fixed the original link now.

To stop this blog getting cluttered with meta-posts, if you see a typo please feel free to PM me direct and I'll fix things immediately.

Edited by patrickwilken on 03 February 2014 at 4:33pm

1 person has voted this message useful



patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2832 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 95 of 295
03 February 2014 at 7:49pm | IP Logged 
Germans love their crime novels, so if you are looking for something to read could do worse than check out the Deutscher Krimi Preis 2014.

The first prize winner, M, by Frederich Ani, involving a missing person's case in Munich looks like a fun read:



It can be bought direct from the publishers, here: http://www.droemer-knaur.de/buch/7780528/m

Edited by patrickwilken on 03 February 2014 at 7:52pm

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patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2832 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 96 of 295
04 February 2014 at 11:15am | IP Logged 
Why I hate learning grammar explicitly:




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