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CELTA certification and everything after

 Language Learning Forum : Immersion, Schools & Certificates Post Reply
23 messages over 3 pages: 13  Next >>
Cavesa
Triglot
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Czech Republic
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 Message 9 of 23
23 June 2013 at 6:18pm | IP Logged 
After taking the course, where would you like to teach? Do you have any such plan? Seems like a lot of people go to Asia these days, are those countries on your list?
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meramarina
Diglot
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United States
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 Message 10 of 23
23 June 2013 at 6:50pm | IP Logged 
I'm thinking that South America or Eastern Europe would be my top choices right now. Also, I could work right here in the US if I find the right contacts, I think, especially in large cities. Right now, Asia is not on my list, but than can change, depending on what happens. But I need to think about this one step at a time, and I'm not even ready for the first step.
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espejismo
Diglot
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Russian Federation
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 Message 11 of 23
24 June 2013 at 8:24am | IP Logged 
I've registered to take the CELTA course with Teaching House at their New York location this August. I'll be
happy to share my experience during and after the course. That is, of course, unless I chicken out. *nervous
laugh*

Oh, and I also have a degree in English! I graduated three weeks ago.

I asked about job placement during my in-person interview with one of their trainers. He said that it's rather
difficult to find a full-time position in NYC, but that there is part-time work out there (though that second
statement didn't sound as convincing as the first one).

I also asked about the job market in Moscow (where I might go after the course), but he didn't really give me
any information that was not already on the website--"trainees whose native language is not English find it
easier to gain employment in their country of origin"--or something to that effect. This also kind of answers
whether being a non-native speaker is a serious disadvantage...

Another thing that worries me is that I'm currently in Brazil, trying to absorb as much Portuguese as possible.
That, and I'm helping a friend of mine here learn Russian, so I end up reading about how to teach Russian to
foreigners instead of completing the pre-course task and familiarizing myself with the recommended texts...
Something tells me it's going to be difficult to switch back into English mode after another six weeks in Brazil.
X_X

I'm going off on a personal tangent, so.... If you (or anyone else) want to see the pre-interview task, the pre-
course task, or find out the titles of the recommended texts, send me a PM.


Edited by espejismo on 24 June 2013 at 8:38am

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Crush
Tetraglot
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 Message 12 of 23
24 June 2013 at 9:03am | IP Logged 
I did a TEFL course in Spain. I don't have a degree and had no trouble finding work in Spain. Now i'm in China, originally teaching English, now just studying. I don't think you'll have any trouble finding work abroad with a degree (honestly i don't think they really care what your degree's in) and CELTA certificate.

Personally i felt like the course itself was a complete waste of time, you don't really get a feel for teaching until you start regularly teaching classes. The most useful part of the course was that it got me a student visa for two years ;)

You could get a job in China now without the CELTA, you wouldn't even need a degree, though without a degree you might need to search a little harder (essentially finding a school willing to fake a degree for you, which there are quite a few).

I imagine the course i took was pretty standard: lots of busywork and useless "theory". For me, it was essentially my gateway into Spain so i stuck it through. I've always found the first couple weeks of class are a bit nervewrecking, after that things get much easier.
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BR
Diglot
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Austria
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 Message 13 of 23
24 June 2013 at 9:06am | IP Logged 
I did the CELTA at International House in Budapest. Apparently it was the cheapest place
in Europe to do it. I don't have anything to compare it with, and I still haven't used
the qualification to teach in a classroom, but I think it was ok to good. It was
certainly serious, although to me it felt on some level like a typical UK 'tick all the
boxes' exercise, which kind of got on my nerves.

It was very intense and I found it very stressful. I didn't sleep very the whole time I
was there, since I went straight from working as a postman to doing the course, which
completely messed up my sleep patterns. I'd recommend trying to take a week off before
doing it or at least seek to be as rested as possible. It would also be very helpful to
buy copies of the two or three textbooks that they rely on very heavily when they ask you
to write essays and produce lesson plans, that would make your life much easier.
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Cavesa
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
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Studies: Spanish, German, Italian

 
 Message 14 of 23
24 June 2013 at 5:27pm | IP Logged 
espejismo wrote:

--"trainees whose native language is not English find it
easier to gain employment in their country of origin"--or something to that effect. This also kind of answers whether being a non-native speaker is a serious disadvantage...


That is quite surprising to me. I thought in many countries the schools are mostly hungry for the natives and therefore easier take them with just the CELTA without any degree. Perhaps the myth "native teacher is the best teacher no matter what" is getting weaker.
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espejismo
Diglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
Joined 4784 days ago

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Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: Spanish, Greek, Azerbaijani

 
 Message 15 of 23
24 June 2013 at 8:12pm | IP Logged 
Cavesa wrote:
espejismo wrote:

--"trainees whose native language is not English find it
easier to gain employment in their country of origin"--or something to that effect. This also kind of answers
whether being a non-native speaker is a serious disadvantage...


That is quite surprising to me. I thought in many countries the schools are mostly hungry for the natives and
therefore easier take them with just the CELTA without any degree. Perhaps the myth "native teacher is the
best teacher no matter what" is getting weaker.


I think what is meant by that statement is that if you're Russian (or whatever), it's easier to find employment in
Russia because you're expected to know how to navigate the local job market and be aware of the particular
kind of problems that your fellow contrymen encounter in learning English. Then there's the issue of not
having enough native speakers to go around. This might not be true for Czech Republic, but the further east
you go... Out of all the people I know is Moscow, nobody has/had a native teacher unless they study/studied
abroad.

It might also have to do with the fact that some countries (in Asia, I believe) require you to be a citizen of an
"inner circle" English-speaking country for visa purposes. Individual language schools might also have this
requirement.. I just came across this ad for a position in Turkey: "Must have teaching certificate
(CELTA/TEFL or similar), Passport issued by USA, Canada, the UK, Ireland, South Africa, Australia or New
Zealand" (source). This is
somewhat reassuring for me because I have US citizenship, but the concept itself is kind of ridiculous. Being
of a certain nationality is not always a telltale sign that you're fully competent in English...

Take my words with a grain of salt because I'm mostly reporting what I've read online.

Edited by espejismo on 24 June 2013 at 8:18pm

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Cavesa
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
Joined 4742 days ago

3277 posts - 6779 votes 
Speaks: Czech*, FrenchC2, EnglishC1
Studies: Spanish, German, Italian

 
 Message 16 of 23
24 June 2013 at 8:34pm | IP Logged 
Ah, that Turkey ad is very discriminatory as it divides people by nationality, not skills. And stupid, many immigrants have got the passport and their English is by far not native like.

Well, I'd expect that the less natives are on the market, the easier it must be for them to get the job. This point of view is new to me, thanks.


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