Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Language study as a doctoral student

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
13 messages over 2 pages: 1 2  Next >>
Po-ru
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3911 days ago

173 posts - 235 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: Korean, Spanish, Norwegian, Mandarin, French

 
 Message 1 of 13
25 April 2013 at 3:12am | IP Logged 
I have personally e-mailed Prof Arguelles this question, but I think I should also share it with the forum. I was wondering how a doctoral student, who was interested in also pursuing polyglottery the manner Prof Arguelles has, could possibly continue pursuing language study if it is unrelated to one's doctoral work? I will be entering a program soon and unfortunately probably won't need to obtain any new language skills, though I greatly want to. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this or any tips on how to manage a doctoral workload and also continue in one's study to become a cultured polyglot?
1 person has voted this message useful



sehiralti
Triglot
Newbie
Finland
Joined 3188 days ago

15 posts - 27 votes
Speaks: Turkish*, EnglishC2, German
Studies: Swedish, Finnish

 
 Message 2 of 13
25 April 2013 at 8:22am | IP Logged 
I'm doing a master's degree now. It's not exactly doctorate, but it's a research degree so it might correspond slightly
to the first years of a Grad School in US. I find that one can actually make some time for language learning. What I
do is, during the breaks I start a new language (if I want to, of course) and study it very, very intensively. Up to 8-10
hrs a day for 1-2 weeks. During this time, I try to come to a point where I can understand more or less what is
spoken (not necessarily understanding every word) and read native material to at least enjoy them somehow. After
that, learning becomes natural and I can just work on a language 0,5-1 hour a day to maintain what I learned and
go on learning new words as I read.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Cabaire
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4030 days ago

725 posts - 1351 votes 

 
 Message 3 of 13
25 April 2013 at 1:46pm | IP Logged 
Afer 1-2 weeks of learning a new language, you are able to enjoy reading native material and understand what is spoken?
I am flabbergasted. I myself need 1-2 years to accomplish that goal. Your short term memory must be fantastic!
3 persons have voted this message useful



sehiralti
Triglot
Newbie
Finland
Joined 3188 days ago

15 posts - 27 votes
Speaks: Turkish*, EnglishC2, German
Studies: Swedish, Finnish

 
 Message 4 of 13
25 April 2013 at 6:52pm | IP Logged 
Cabaire wrote:
Afer 1-2 weeks of learning a new language, you are able to enjoy reading
native material and understand what is spoken?
I am flabbergasted. I myself need 1-2 years to accomplish that goal. Your short term memory must be fantastic!


Sorry that I was not very exact with my post. I can come to a certain level where I can enjoy things but I do not
understand everything of course, not even close. The level I was talking about is understanding the words that is
spoken (i.e., not necessarily understanding the meaning of each word, but understanding what the words are
anyway) and being able to read simple materials intended for native speakers and enjoy enough to go on. I did
something similar with Swedish recently, although the terms were a bit different: I didn't have enough time to
study everyday but I studies for about 1 hour everyday for 1,5 months, and now I have been studying intensively
for almost a week (and I have one more free week). I can watch swedish tv, enjoy what I watch, if they have
swedish subtitles (usually intended for the deaf) I can understand almost everything. Of course, one could argue
that I already speak English and German which are quite similar to Swedish. But what I did in this intensive week
is mostly L-R'ing and many people similarly got quick results with L-R.

Although it goes without saying that if I were to study a language with a different scripting system it would take
much, much more to learn. But I just have a low threshold of understanding, I guess. I don't try to understand
every single word and I switch to simple native material as soon as possible, which are usually graphic novels that
I already read before. I think I started reading graphic novels in Swedish in my 2nd or 3rd week. And with the
second month over now, I'm about to finish the first novel I read in Swedish and I intend to start a next one next
week. I will try a similar approach with Finnish in May, where I have 2-3 weeks with almost nothing else I have to
do. I am curious to see if I can progress as much as I can. But my advice would still be to study as intensively as
possible for a few weeks and to try to switch to enjoyable material as soon as possible.
3 persons have voted this message useful



patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 2964 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 5 of 13
25 April 2013 at 8:18pm | IP Logged 
Po-ru wrote:
I have personally e-mailed Prof Arguelles this question, but I think I should also share it with the forum. I was wondering how a doctoral student, who was interested in also pursuing polyglottery the manner Prof Arguelles has, could possibly continue pursuing language study if it is unrelated to one's doctoral work? I will be entering a program soon and unfortunately probably won't need to obtain any new language skills, though I greatly want to. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with this or any tips on how to manage a doctoral workload and also continue in one's study to become a cultured polyglot?


It probably depends a bit on your doctorate. I think it's certainly possible to spend an hour or so a day studying languages while doing your doctorate. I would recommend not telling anyone, as they will inevitably think you are slacking off.

It depends a lot on your level. If you are B1+ in a language, you can study a lot just by reading extensively, add a few podcasts etc and you are laughing. If you doing something like molecular biology, there is a lot of downtime during experiments where you could just as easily be doing Anki revision as updating FB or doing Twitter.

Having done, and watched lots of other people do doctorates, it's not all equally busy. If you have a lot of coursework in the first year or so it might be quite hard to find time to study depending on levels of homework. The middle periods where you are doing only thesis work are relatively stress free, and this period takes up some years, so there is plenty of time to slowly learn a language.
1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 3138 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 6 of 13
25 April 2013 at 8:23pm | IP Logged 
Quote:
I would recommend not telling anyone, as they will inevitably think you are
slacking off.


Most people don't think this actually. Think they'd see it as good self-development,
especially if you're doing it in your free time.



Edited by tarvos on 25 April 2013 at 8:23pm

3 persons have voted this message useful



vermillon
Triglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3109 days ago

602 posts - 1042 votes 
Speaks: French*, EnglishC2, Mandarin
Studies: Japanese, German

 
 Message 7 of 13
25 April 2013 at 9:35pm | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
Quote:
I would recommend not telling anyone, as they will inevitably think you are slacking off.


Most people don't think this actually. Think they'd see it as good self-development, especially if you're doing it in your free time.


I don't know if you have a PhD, but many people (in academia) consider a doctorate as a moment of your life when "free time" is a thing that doesn't exist... if you have fun, it means you're not working towards your PhD, i.e. slacking off. (they think)
3 persons have voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 5028 days ago

9753 posts - 15777 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 8 of 13
26 April 2013 at 3:05am | IP Logged 
@sehiralti all of your languages are actually considered pretty 'clear'. Of course a completely different language would be difficult, but French or Danish are also very difficult in this regard!

@Cabaire enjoyment doesn't always require [much] understanding :)


2 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 13 messages over 2 pages: 2  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.2500 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.