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All about the orange!

 Language Learning Forum : Philological Room Post Reply
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Ketutar
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 Message 33 of 48
31 October 2011 at 9:33am | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
Right now I'm trying to remember another word for beige than "beige" in any language.


beige

dictionary gives these synonyms in English: light brown, biscuit, buff, café au lait, camel, cream, ecru, fawn, khaki, mushroom, neutral, oatmeal, off-white, sand, tan, taupe

We use "light brown" and "sand" in Finnish. (vaaleanruskea, hiekanvärinen; vaalea=light, ruskea=brown, hiekka=sand, väri=color värinen≈of color, colored, light and sand are in genetive case but written as one word because it's not "light's brown or sand's colored, but light brown and the color of sand)

buff is this soft leather, ecru; "crude", is apparently the name of the color of "raw linen"; fawn is the baby deer that apparently are considered light brown in color; khaki comes from Persian 'khākī' 'dusty', tan is the color of tanned skin or leather and taupe is from French "la taupe" - mole.

Edited by Ketutar on 31 October 2011 at 9:36am

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jeff_lindqvist
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 Message 34 of 48
31 October 2011 at 11:06am | IP Logged 
PaulLambeth wrote:
Just as you'd find all sorts of nuances if you attached '-y' to any colour and hyphenated it with the next:
orangey-red - 404.000 hits
orangey-pink - 137.000 hits
orangey-pinky-blue - 6 hits (someone, please, show me that colour in an image)


True, I just pointed this out as it's easy to come up with a fair number of colours/nuances if you play with the language a bit, and no language is the "winner".

As for the orangey-pinky-blue, I wonder if it doesn't refer to an object with all three colours sepearated, rather than a mix. Note that I didn't include "gulröd" (yellowy-red) in my examples, since those hits seemed to refer to things that were both yellow and red, not "orange". By the same token, you can record a movie, take a picture or print something in "svartvitt" ("black and white").
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PaulLambeth
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 Message 35 of 48
31 October 2011 at 11:22am | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
PaulLambeth wrote:
Just as you'd find all sorts of nuances if you attached '-y' to any colour and hyphenated it with the next:
orangey-red - 404.000 hits
orangey-pink - 137.000 hits
orangey-pinky-blue - 6 hits (someone, please, show me that colour in an image)


True, I just pointed this out as it's easy to come up with a fair number of colours/nuances if you play with the language a bit, and no language is the "winner".

As for the orangey-pinky-blue, I wonder if it doesn't refer to an object with all three colours sepearated, rather than a mix. Note that I didn't include "gulröd" (yellowy-red) in my examples, since those hits seemed to refer to things that were both yellow and red, not "orange". By the same token, you can record a movie, take a picture or print something in "svartvitt" ("black and white").


Yeah, I was kidding around, and at the same time proving your point a little further. I think orangey-pinky-blue was only referring to sunsets, so indeed a seperation.

---

Of those synonyms of 'beige', none of them is a proper synonym. Off-white and sandy are close colour matches, but beige also has additional associations with boring clothing taste and being a generally boring person ... although I beg to differ, as I love the colour.

Read from that what you will.

Edited by PaulLambeth on 31 October 2011 at 11:23am

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stelingo
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 Message 36 of 48
01 November 2011 at 1:11am | IP Logged 
Fasulye wrote:
Translation of the fruit "orange" and the colour "orange":

1. German: die Apfelsine - orange
2. Dutch: de sinaasappel - oranje
3. French: l'orange - orange
4. Italian: l'arancia - arancione
5. Spanish: la naranja - naranja
6. Esperanto: la orangxo - orangxkolora
7. Turkish: portakal - portakalrengi
8. Danish: appelsin - orange, orangefarvet
9. Portuguese: la naranja - cor-de-laranja
10. Swedish: appelsin - orange, orangefärgad

Fasulye


In Portuguese the fruit is a laranja.
In Czech orange (fruit) is pomeranč and the colour pomerančový.
In Polish pomarańcza and pomarańczowy.
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Iversen
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 Message 37 of 48
01 November 2011 at 7:37am | IP Logged 
PaulLamberth has explaned very well why beige is different from the color of a blondish dromedary or an old sofa or a kitchen wall which should have been painted twenty years ago. It has also a slightly violet tinge which is different from the more yellowish nuances mentioned by Ketutar.

The word orange (for the color) is sufficient common to have become fuzzy - you can have all kinds of orange (some quite far from the color of a typical orange), and therefore you often have to subdivide it into reddish or golden or yellowish or dark or light orange to indicate the intended colour with any degree of precision. I have not seen beige, mauve end a few other color names with such supplementary information.

Color names can be made more specific by reference to specific chemical compounds, but also by reference to specific objects or even legends. The funniest is probably Isabellagul (Danish and Swedish for 'Isabella yellow'). The story goes that her majesty queen Isabella the Catholic of Castile wowed not to change her underwear until the last moor had left Spain, and ...


Edited by Iversen on 01 November 2011 at 7:45am

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Ketutar
Triglot
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 Message 38 of 48
01 November 2011 at 1:17pm | IP Logged 
Other synonymes to beige:
oystern, desert, dune...

more importantly:
bland, pale, bleak, drab, blah, dishwater...

To call it a color is to give it too much importance.

It certainly is not a "basic color category", as it really means the color of raw and boring things. In most languages it IS beige (that is, a recent foreign loan - entered in English in Victorian times... go figure :-D), and beige doesn't only mean color but also something as exciting as dishwater or unwashed linen... The royal crown on the corner doesn't make the name more interesting :-D (Isabelline or isabel(la) colored is a color name in the rest of the world as well, and it too is "too yellow" to be "beige" :-D)
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Iversen
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 Message 39 of 48
01 November 2011 at 3:27pm | IP Logged 
I didn't suggest that queen Isabella's underpants ever became beige. What they were in the beginning I can't say, but they might have been beige - I'm not much of a specialist in the underwear of Spanish royalty in former times.
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Ketutar
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 Message 40 of 48
01 November 2011 at 4:31pm | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
I didn't suggest that queen Isabella's underpants ever became beige. What they were in the beginning I can't say, but they might have been beige - I'm not much of a specialist in the underwear of Spanish royalty in former times.


I'm pretty sure they were the very definition of "beige", even if they started as bleached linen. :-D

About specialty - what we "know" of Spanish royalty in the time of the introduction of isabelline, is that the queens didn't have feet... I assume they lacked also the body parts necessary for the use of underwear too.

Other synonymes are be "parchment", "yeast" and "wheat" (and the other cereals) - the undescribed dirty light brownish. Which undertone you consider beige to have is pretty subjective. Some approve "golden beiges", some just "linen shades", which is more a browning gray.

http://sunshineandlemonade.blogspot.com/2009/06/shades-of-be ige.html

Isabella colored horses are often called palominos, which implies "dove colored". There's also the term "perlino" and "cremello" - all these horses could be said to be beige.


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