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Accents in Esperanto

 Language Learning Forum : Esperanto Post Reply
19 messages over 3 pages: 13  Next >>
michau
Tetraglot
Groupie
Norway
lang-8.com/member/49
Joined 4771 days ago

86 posts - 135 votes 
Speaks: Polish*, English, NorwegianC1, Mandarin
Studies: Spanish, Sign Language
Studies: Burmese, Toki Pona, Greenlandic

 
 Message 9 of 19
10 December 2010 at 1:15am | IP Logged 
ellasevia wrote:
I've always been told that the pronunciation of sounds in Esperanto is quite like (and possibly based on?) Spanish and Italian.


Esperanto has some sounds that don't exist in standard Spanish or Italian: h, ĵ, ŝ. Pronounciation rules are also quite different. It seems to me that the sounds of Esperanto are based on Polish or Belarusian, the languages that Zamenhof spoke at native or near-native level. But it's based on them as they were spoken 100 years ago - now Polish has lost the equivalent of Esperanto's "h" sound, and has only the one corresponding to "ĥ".
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Luai_lashire
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
luai-lashire.deviant
Joined 4373 days ago

384 posts - 560 votes 
Speaks: English*, Esperanto
Studies: Japanese, French

 
 Message 10 of 19
10 December 2010 at 1:59am | IP Logged 
My brother has always said I sound like I'm speaking Spanish with a Russian accent, when I speak Esperanto.

I generally try to mimic the accents of the speakers on Radio Verda as I find them very pleasant to listen to. Also,
they sometimes feature a guy reading buddhist proverbs who has a really pronounced accent (I don't know what his
nationality is) that I am quite enamored of. He draws out all the aŭ sounds in a really interesting way.

I personally really like the many different accents in which eo can be spoken, and I rarely have trouble
understanding them.
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Journeyer
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
tristan85.blogspot.c
Joined 5413 days ago

946 posts - 1110 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish, German
Studies: Sign Language

 
 Message 11 of 19
05 January 2011 at 12:18am | IP Logged 
michau wrote:
Esperanto has some sounds that don't exist in standard Spanish or Italian: h, ĵ, ŝ.


I don't know about Italian, but I believe the jx anyways does exist in Argentinian Spanish. It's not standard Spanish, though, as you point out. However, I have also heard a lot of speakers pronounce the "ll" letter as in "me llamo" or "lluvia" like a jx sound or something very akin to it.

I can't think of a word with the sx sound, but it seems like I've heard it used, if for nothing else the "shh" sound for silence when I've lived among Spanish-speakers.


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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5750 days ago

3133 posts - 4350 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 12 of 19
06 March 2013 at 8:53pm | IP Logged 
My favorite accent in Esperanto is that of a Ukrainian. I've heard it in real life. There is a single line in Pasaporto al la Tuta Mondo that has it, but other than that, I don't know where to find any recordings of Ukrainians speaking Esperanto. Does anyone know of such recordings?
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Марк
Senior Member
Russian Federation
Joined 3601 days ago

2096 posts - 2972 votes 
Speaks: Russian*

 
 Message 13 of 19
06 March 2013 at 9:40pm | IP Logged 
In general, all the phonemes must differ. It's not very easy beacuse there are a lot of
consonants (especially sibilants) and consonant clusters.
There is quite a lot of freedom, however. We were taught that, say, palatalization of
consonants before i was OK, but ti shouldn't be pronounced like ci.
We were corrected a lot about unstressed vowels of course. The teacher tried to teach us
the sound "h", but it was useless and the group continued pronouncing hx instead.
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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5750 days ago

3133 posts - 4350 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 14 of 19
06 March 2013 at 11:40pm | IP Logged 
Марк wrote:
In general, all the phonemes must differ. It's not very easy because there are a lot of consonants (especially sibilants) and consonant clusters.
There is quite a lot of freedom, however. We were taught that, say, palatalization of
consonants before i was OK, but ti shouldn't be pronounced like ci.
We were corrected a lot about unstressed vowels of course. The teacher tried to teach us the sound "h", but it was useless and the group continued pronouncing hx instead.


That's all a bit over my head as far as turning your words into meaning. Apparently you have a good bit of linguistics in your background. Your profile says "Russian", which makes me wonder what your accent is like. I'm aware of Radio Esperanto, which I assume has Russian Esperantists. Is there a lot of difference between Ukrainian and Russian in your ears? Or is that too broad a question, since English accent varies a lot within the United States, and then comparing it to the U.K., or Australia is again different.

By the way, I was talking to my wife the other night and I told her that a Russian English accent is prestigious in my ears.

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alang
Diglot
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 5766 days ago

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Speaks: English*, Spanish

 
 Message 15 of 19
07 March 2013 at 4:03am | IP Logged 
The "Pasporto al la Tuta Mondo" program has many speakers around the world. There was
a description on the diversity of the accents and how they are all accepted in
pronunciation. I remember hearing one man and one woman from Japan speak Esperanto. I
understood the man easier, than the woman, but with repeating the video I started to
understand the Japanese woman easier.

Are there other links of Esperanto Radio from different countries?

I want to expose my ears to different varieties. When I attended N.A.S.K. many years
ago, I talked to a woman who was from Nepal. I had no problem understanding her
pronunciation, with the exception of my limited vocabulary. She used the Nepalese
grammar and I understood it in English grammar.

Edited by alang on 07 March 2013 at 6:20am

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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5750 days ago

3133 posts - 4350 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 16 of 19
07 March 2013 at 4:43am | IP Logged 
alang wrote:
. When I attended N.A.S.K. many years ago, I talked to a woman who was from Nepal. I had no problem understanding her pronunciation, with the exception of my limited vocabulary. She used the Nepalese grammar and I understood it in English grammar.


How many weeks was your NASK class? This year, it looks like there are 1, 2, and 3 week classes in North Carolina. How was your Esperanto when you started, and where did it end up? What was the experience like?



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