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Chung at work / Chung pri práci

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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 7000 days ago

4228 posts - 8259 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 9 of 541
06 July 2010 at 4:43am | IP Logged 
I just finished the trip yesterday and it was great from a cultural point of view. Midsummer in the countryside was the highlight but I also enjoyed visiting Turku and Savo and of course Helsinki as well as making new friends among the Finns. From a linguistic point of view the trip brought mixed results. I spoke more English than Finnish and was confounded by the degree to which colloquial Finnish differs from standard Finnish. Yet I came upon Finnish-language geek heaven in bookstores by picking up some books ranging from Gummerus' new, thick English-Finnish dictionary (70 000 headwords) on sale for 17 Euros (regular price is around 50 Euros!) to a couple of Finnish translations from the series of French short stories "Le Petit Nicolas".

I'll add some comments in the revised Finnish profile about the relevant stuff that I bought and saw in Finnish bookstores.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 7000 days ago

4228 posts - 8259 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 10 of 541
18 August 2010 at 5:40pm | IP Logged 
I've finished chapter 34 in "Finnish for Foreigners" and now it's onto the next chapter.

I recently received my copy of Koirien Kalevala (The Dogs' Kalevala) and I highly recommend it to anyone learning Finnish even if it's just an adaptation of the Kalevala as a picture book. The text is appropriate for someone who is at high-beginning or low-intermediate stage in learning Finnish and some of the illustrations will bring a smile.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 7000 days ago

4228 posts - 8259 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 11 of 541
28 September 2010 at 6:32pm | IP Logged 
It's been a busy time recently but only some of it has been occupied by language-learning, unfortunately.

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I've just come back from a trip through Eastern Europe and in Slovakia managed to get my hands on the new Slovak course for intermediate students "Slovenčina ako cudzí jazyk - B. Hovorme spolu po slovensky!". God knows when I'll start working through it but getting suitable material is half the battle. It looks pretty good being broadly designed as a communicative course with two textbooks, two workbooks, two CDs and a book on grammar. It's definitely better than trying to plough through otherwise similar courses that are designed for beginners.

In Slovakia I also learned about the quasi-folk-hero Ladislav Meliško. He is a middle-aged man whose drunken shouting and cursing annoyed his neighbours so much that they secretly set up microphones in his apartment and then released the recordings on YouTube. Run a search on YouTube with "Melisko" and you can hear vulgar Slovak. I got a good laugh when my hosts showed me the clips on YouTube and I also got a small dose of the world of Slovak cursing.

Here are a few particularly funny instances of Meliško's cursing (NB offensive language used but only so if you are thin-skinned AND know Czech or Slovak)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJrDYLo2EY0 (Meliško's shouting as a voice-over in "Just for Laughs")

www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpmSDBkHDAA (Meliško's complaints about there being no onions at home)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMInaWPK2tg (Meliško's and his wife's arguing as voice-overs of Cookie Monster and Martha Stewart)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZkKftel-5s (Meliško's ranting as a voice-over of a speech by Obama)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvMN6DA01HI (Meliško's ranting is the subject of a national news report when a prankster linked recordings of him to a PA system in a residential neighbourhood in a town in northern Slovakia)

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While in Poland I picked up these new words or idioms whose use by a foreigner would illustrate a certain understanding of Polish cultural sensibilities.

1) Raz na ruski rok (rarely) - It literally means "once in a Russian year" with the implication of rarity inherent in no one knowing with certainty how long a "Russian" year is.

2) ...jak w czeskim filmie (used to refer to something incomprehensible or incoherent) - It literally means "...just like in a Czech film" and reflects an impression among many Poles about the absurdity or incoherent nature of Czech cinema.

3) połówka (half-liter bottle of any kind of liquor or spirits) - The term is derived from "pół" (half) and is used in a somewhat similar way to the English terms "mickey" or "26er" (i.e. 26 oz. bottle of alcohol). For example:

"A coście robili wczoraj?" - "Nic szczególnego. Zrobiliśmy połówkę i gadaliśmy."

"But what did you do yesterday?" - "Nothing in particular. We did (i.e. drank/downed) a half-liter and chatted."
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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 7000 days ago

4228 posts - 8259 votes 

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